Monday, May 04, 2009

I Look Like a Farmer Baby, But I'm a Lover

I was reading this cheerful post from the Chronicle Books Blog about sorting through boxes of used books (and wishing for the millionth time I worked at Chronicle Books, even though it would involve living on the wrong coast), and that got me to thinking about the books I've bought for their cover alone (although mostly they also looked like good reads, at least the ones in English). So since nothing of note happened today that I could possibly write about (it rained, I walked around the reservoir, I went to work, I had dinner, it was Monday all day), here are some of my favorite pretty faces, none of which ran me more than a few bucks:

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7 Comments:

Blogger Levi Stahl said...

Assuming your expenditures stayed well under four figures, this seems to me like money well spent. Some striking covers there.

10:23 PM  
OpenID bklynharuspex said...

really fine group. what the heck is the tigers & fleas one about?

11:18 PM  
Blogger Mary Catherine said...

Wolves in trees, crows in trees, cats in trees.

5:00 AM  
Blogger Lisa said...

Unfortunately -- and I say unfortunately because it certainly takes up space in my brain that I could use for other things -- I remember how much I paid for just about every book I own (and where I bought them, and from whom). That batch came to $21, I believe. The last four were a buck each. Well -- three of them were. The Raymond Chandler I stole from my parents in 1979.

The Tigers & Fleas book is about animal training and trainers, with an emphasis on the exotic. Fantastic '50s cartoon type line drawings by the author.

MC, don't forget Boys in the Trees.

6:39 AM  
Blogger Miss T said...

I wouldn't have been able to resist those, either. Fabulous!

11:05 AM  
Blogger Margarita said...

I would totally love to look through the "Moderne Kunst" - looks like a wonderful find! The Wold Man would be a close next one. Good choices.

11:22 PM  
OpenID bklynharuspex said...

And now, raccoons in trees!

And I am reminded of a great poem, Yeats' "Sailing to Byzantium," where he talks of "the young/ In one another's arms, birds in the trees/ -- Those dying generations -- at their song/ The salmon-falls, the mackerel-crowded seas."

9:36 PM  

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